LISTEN

Listen to Episode One of the Voice of Real Australia podcast: Lake Macquarie coal-ash pollution concerns, a tour of the quirky town of Dimboola, and a Tumut teacher's COVID-19 children's book

On this week's Voice of Real Australia podcast...

A Postcard from Dimboola

Dimboola is a town on the Wimmera river in the wheat belt of western Victoria. It lies near the Little Desert National Park and is surrounded by agricultural land that produces wheat, barley and wool. It has a population of about 1700 people.

Dimboola resident Tim Skyrme makes cigar box guitars out of recycled timber. PHOTO: Alex Darling

Dimboola resident Tim Skyrme makes cigar box guitars out of recycled timber. PHOTO: Alex Darling

It seems like any other regional centre. But there is something about Dimboola that is drawing people from far and wide. Tree-changers are changing the face of the town and it seems to be just the beginning.

I've only sold to four locals in the last three years. The rest of them have all been mainly metropolitan Melbourne buyers

Garry Price

We take a tour of the town to see what makes it so attractive to locals and out-of-towners. And we meet some of Dimboola's newest residents.

Coal-Ash: Waste Product or Resource?

Residents of Lake Macquarie, south of Newcastle, are concerned about the impact nearby Eraring and Vales Point power stations are having on the lake and its ecosystem. Coal-ash, a byproduct of coal-fired power generation, is stored in large dams on the shores of Lake Macquarie.

Coal ash is a byproduct of coal power generation and makes up a quarter of Australia's waste stream PHOTO: Laura Corrigan

Coal ash is a byproduct of coal power generation and makes up a quarter of Australia's waste stream PHOTO: Laura Corrigan

We followed community members and environmentalists testing the water for heavy metals that can leach from the local coal-ash dams.

I would never let my grandkids swim in this lake now. We used to catch fish and crabs, and I'll never eat fish out of here again. It's heartbreaking.

Lee Rogers

We discovered there is more to coal-ash than we expected. The byproduct can be reused and Australia is far behind other countries who reuse most of their coal-ash.

The World Caught a Germ

It is hard enough for us to stay on top of the COVID-19 pandemic so you can imagine how children are struggling to understand what is going on.

Author of 'The World Caught a Germ', Hannah Goldspink, created her own resource to teach children about the COVID-19 pandemic. PICTURE: Contributed

Author of 'The World Caught a Germ', Hannah Goldspink, created her own resource to teach children about the COVID-19 pandemic. PICTURE: Contributed

A preschool teacher from Tumut in New South Wales' Riverina took it upon herself to help explain the pandemic to infants.She wrote a children's book. We get a sneak peek of the book and the story behind it.

Listen and subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or your preferred podcast platform. Just search for Voice of Real Australia.

New to podcasts? See our article on how to listen to podcasts.

Get the transcript for this episode.

Join the conversation on our Facebook page, and sign up for the newsletter.

This story Listen to why Dimboola is the escape you were looking for first appeared on Newcastle Herald.