Former Evanston man and Olympic cyclist to be sentenced in July

Jack Bobridge stands with then Barossa Council director works and engineering, Mayor Bim Lange in November 2012 at the recreational path. Photo: Herald archive
Jack Bobridge stands with then Barossa Council director works and engineering, Mayor Bim Lange in November 2012 at the recreational path. Photo: Herald archive

The 27-kilometre recreational path linking Tanunda to Gawler continues to carry the 'Jack Bobridge' name after the former Olympic cyclist, who called Evanston home, was found guilty of drug dealing this month.

On Friday, Jack Ronald Bobridge was found guilty by a jury in Perth, where the former professional cyclist now resides.

Bobridge pleaded not guilty to four counts of supplying MDMA.

He is expected to be sentenced in July.

"The 29-year-old told the court he began partying a lot and taking cocaine and ecstasy, after moving to Europe to pursue a career in professional cycling," NINE reveals.

During the peak of his career he competed in the Beijing, London and Rio De Janeiro Olympics.

Bobridge's cycling career highlights also included receiving two gold medals at the 2014 Commonwealth Games.

His rise to sporting fame instigated The Barossa Council in 2012 to approach the cyclist to name the $5.45 million recreational path in his honour.

According to Barossa Council Mayor Bim Lange, council has "not discussed or considered" changing the track's name.

Mr Lange, who was the council's director of works and engineering during the planning and construction phase of the path, said the track continues to play a significant role in supporting the region's economy by way of cycling tourism.

"Should Mr Bobridge be found guilty and sentenced with no appeal, council may wish to consider (a name change) in due course," Mayor Lange said.

While Bobridge was not at the official opening of the completed path in May 2014, his father Kahl Bobridge and sister were in attendance.

"We are very proud and honoured to have a bike track named after him," Kahl Bobridge had said.

Having previously spoken to the Barossa Herald numerous times during his rise to fame, Bobridge had shared how honoured he was to have the track named after him.

He further praised the landowners for allowing the track to run through their property and embracing the plan.