Eden Valley to unveil five unique heritage silhouettes

The Blacksmith Workshop silhouette installed by Eden Valley Institute Sculpture committee members, Lynne Jones, Michael Medley and Bevan Mclaren with volunteer Dig Dunford.
The Blacksmith Workshop silhouette installed by Eden Valley Institute Sculpture committee members, Lynne Jones, Michael Medley and Bevan Mclaren with volunteer Dig Dunford.

Five unique and eye-catching heritage silhouettes have been installed in Eden Valley to display the social history of the town, in what is stage one of several planned stages to bring to life the area’s past.

The official unveiling falls on Sunday, December 16, at 1pm with support by Barossa mayor Bim Lange.

The heritage silhouette project is the culmination of 18 months of hard work by members of both the Eden Valley Institute and the Eden Valley Tourism Promotions Group.

The silhouettes, constructed of 10mm steel, each measuring about 2.6m long and 1.8m high, represent the Eden Valley Institute, the old Blacksmith Workshop, the former Buttery, the Church of St Petrie and the Eden Valley Hotel.

Each of the signs is unique with a common motif of a wine barrel with Eden Valley logo, a wine bottle and glass and a fairy wren. An interpretative sign further complements each installation to provide a context to the images.

“We want people to stop, look, read and learn about our beautiful town,” Eden Valley Institute committee member Lynne Jones explained.

“There is nothing like this in the Barossa.

“The silhouettes visually bring the social history of Eden Valley to life in an easy to understand, personal and tactile way. We hope that local schools will use them too.”

The project was set in motion following the 150th Anniversary celebrations in 2016. It was decided to spend the profit made from the event, with The Barossa Council’s support, on the art work.

Similar works had been installed in Menzies, WA and the group commissioned the sculptor, Jesse Brampton to bring to life some of the information from ‘This Valley of Eden’ a book written by the Eden Valley Historical Society.

There are plans for three more stages to highlight the history of the area including the Peramangk people, additional significant buildings in the township and in outlying areas, yet these are dependent on getting funding and support from local, state and federal sources.