SA election 2018: Upper House, Lower House – what’s the difference?

STUART ELECTORATE: Who are you eligible to vote for in the March state election?
STUART ELECTORATE: Who are you eligible to vote for in the March state election?

In the March state election, around 1.2 million South Australians will be enrolled to have their say.

With more than 6000 polling officials working at 693 polling places across 47 electorates, it will be one of the largest logistical exercises in SA.

There are a total of 69 Members of Parliament in SA, split into two houses – the House of Assembly (Lower House) and Legislative Council (Upper House).

The House of Assembly is where most legislation starts and this is where Members introduce, discuss and vote on legislation. 

The political party – or coalition of parties – which wins the most seats at the state election, forms government. 

Labor has been in government since the 2002 election, with Jay Weatherill as Premier since 2011.

STUART: Voters must number each box on their ballot paper in order of one to three for their vote to count.

STUART: Voters must number each box on their ballot paper in order of one to three for their vote to count.

House of Assembly

Schubert

Schubert is made up of portions of the councils of Adelaide Hills, Adelaide Plains (formerly Mallala), Barossa, Light and Mid Murray, and includes – among others – the localities of Eden Valley, Nuriootpa, Lyndoch, Springton, Tanunda and Williamstown.

In the electorate of Schubert, constituents will have five options to vote for as their local representative at this year’s election.

The successful candidate will represent the electorate for the next four years.

The current Schubert MP and Liberal candidate is Stephan Knoll. Mr Knoll was elected at the 2014 election, following the retirement of long-serving former Liberal MP Ivan Venning.

Other candidates are: 

  • David Haebich – Labor
  • Paul Brown – SA Best
  • Rikki Lambert – Australian Conservatives
  • Dave Irving – The Greens

Stuart

Stuart includes the city of Port Augusta and the localities of Burra, Eudunda, Gladstone, Hallett, Innamincka, Kapunda, Leigh Creek, Marree, Parachilna, Robertstown, Spalding and Truro. It incorporates the councils of Goyder, Mount Remarkable, Orroroo Carrieton, Peterborough, Port Augusta, portions of the councils of Light, Mid Murray and Northern Areas, as well as part of the Pastoral Unincorporated Area.

Residents in the Stuart electorate can vote on three parties for the House of Assembly.

The current Stuart MP is Dan van Holst Pellekaan, who is running for a third term.

Other candidates are:

  • Khatija Thomas – Labor
  • Brendan Fitzgerald – The Greens

Light

Light includes the suburbs of Buchfelde, Evanston Gardens, Evanston Park, Evanston South, Gawler, Gawler East, Gawler South, Gawler West, Hewett, Hillier, Kudla, Munno Para, Munno Para Downs, Munno Para West, Reid and Willaston.

Light voters will have four options at this year’s election

Tony Piccolo is the current Light MP, representing Labor in the seat since the 2006 election.

Other candidates are:

  • Karen McColl – Liberal Party
  • Carl Teusner – Australian Conservatives
  • Felicity Green – The Greens

Legislative Council

Voters in all electorates will also have their say on who will be voted onto Legislative Council.

If legislation has been supported by over 50 per cent of the House of Assembly, it is then passed and sent to Legislative Council for review. 

There are 22 members of Legislative Council elected to alternating terms, 11 Members will not face a vote during this state election as they serve for an eight year term.

Continuing Members (elected 2014)

Members are elected by a form of proportional representation. The quota for election is one-twelfth of the formal vote, or roughly eight per cent.

Quotas are filled by first preferences and by the distribution of preferences from excluded candidates. 

There are 43 candidates vying for a seat on the Legislative Council, these candidates do not represent an electorate.

Voting for a candidate in Legislative Council has no bearing on who will win the balance of power in the 2018 election, they serve to represent the views of their political party when reviewing legislation. 

To vote for legislative council you can vote one of two ways, above or below the line. You may vote for your preferred party by marking a number 1 next to the group, or you can order them in preference 1-5.
Alternatively, you can mark below the line by numbering 12 squares in order of the candidates of your choice.

To vote for legislative council you can vote one of two ways, above or below the line. You may vote for your preferred party by marking a number 1 next to the group, or you can order them in preference 1-5. Alternatively, you can mark below the line by numbering 12 squares in order of the candidates of your choice.

2018 Ballot Paper (43 Candidates)